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  2010 - Next Year

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Author Topic:   2010 - Next Year
Mr Chievous
Member

Posts: 122
From: Wimberley, TX USofA
Registered: Aug 2004

posted September 07, 2009 02:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Chievous     Edit/Delete Message
Has anyone thought about what it might be like around here year next year if the weather doesn't change from its most recent pattern?

I have and it really makes me wonder how bad it could get.

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freewill
Member

Posts: 211
From: Wimberley Area
Registered: Mar 2009

posted September 07, 2009 07:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for freewill     Edit/Delete Message
Iíve been thinking along the same lines and beginning to worry about our water situation. Iím not sure anybody really knows about the resilience of the aquifer. I have bad feelings when I see Cypress Creek as a mud hole and Jacobís Well as a distant a memory. This is a historical drought for the Wimberley Valley and I feel it will be over eventually. I fear it might never be exactly the same again, though. The weather pattern is supposed to shift next month with the return of the El Nino. I watch the radar on the net and have been amazed at the rain getting almost here and then fading away or going around us. This happens time after time. What we really need is a tropical storm to come ashore and sit over central Texas for a week or so.

The drought that lasted from about 1947 to 1956 caused a lot of destruction, dead trees, dried up wells, dead livestick, etc. Even mesquite and cedar trees died. However, they didnít have what we have now, run-away development. If we continue to build and grow in this little valley there will not be a good outcome. Our politicians seem to be complaisant with the developers out of greed and an insatiable thirst for power.

Some of the people moving here havenít got a clue. A month or two ago a young family moved into a new house in our neighborhood, from Houston. They are having an in-ground swimming pool installed and last week had St. Augustine sod laid in the front yard of their corner lot. Wasteful Fools!

[This message has been edited by freewill (edited September 08, 2009).]

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starstruck
Member

Posts: 588
From: Hays
Registered: Feb 2001

posted September 07, 2009 08:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for starstruck     Edit/Delete Message
I hate to chip in on this topic but I walked around my place this afternoon and noticed an Arizona Ash I planted in 1985 has croaked due to the drought. Outside of the live oak, cedar and mountain laurel everything is dead or dying. It is grim.

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bren
Member

Posts: 56
From: wimberley, tx
Registered: Feb 2009

posted September 08, 2009 02:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bren     Edit/Delete Message
I've been thinking about it too & it's worrying me alot. We've also lost some trees, along with others in our neighborhood. Also have experienced the disbelief with new people moving in this past year & installing 2 pools. Seems so irresponsible & selfish, meanwhile, I worry about our well drying up. Was talking to someone recently from Driftwood whose well stopped 3 weeks ago. They said wells all around them have been going out the last few months. Every week I hear of more going dry. Another year (or more) of this will be beyond devastating. Our politicians need to wake up, face reality & show some true leadership & planning for the future. Developers need to get a conscience. Many need to realize that water is our most precious resource & is vital for our very lives. It cannot be taken for granted any longer.

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Reddog
Member

Posts: 396
From: dripping springs, tx, usa
Registered: Apr 2008

posted September 08, 2009 11:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Reddog     Edit/Delete Message
Many of us have only voluntary water rationing, not living in a city/town. But, at least my household, are doing it. dishes washed by hand, water used for plants. Saving bath water for watering as well. Yard, what yard, all natives here, and they are on their own. Dirty car drives as well as a clean one.

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Reddog
Member

Posts: 396
From: dripping springs, tx, usa
Registered: Apr 2008

posted September 08, 2009 12:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Reddog     Edit/Delete Message
Arizona ash isn't very well suited for around here. There is a native ash that does much better.

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freewill
Member

Posts: 211
From: Wimberley Area
Registered: Mar 2009

posted September 08, 2009 01:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for freewill     Edit/Delete Message
I have a 20 ft. previously healthy oak tree on my property that turned brown in about 2 weeks, now looks dead to me, but a neighbor told me it is just dormant. I think it is/was a white oak, definitely not a live oak. The trees that seem to be going down hill the quickest are the nut trees and others that grow creek side, pecan, walnut and hickory. The Live Oaks, Persimmon, Ashe Juniper (cedar), Texas Ash and Hackberry are okay for now. Even the Agarita vines are looking dead in places, I didnít think you could kill it with gasoline.

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starstruck
Member

Posts: 588
From: Hays
Registered: Feb 2001

posted September 08, 2009 01:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for starstruck     Edit/Delete Message
Yes, those Arizona Ash were a mistake but a tree nursery at the time swore by them. By the way that nursery is long,long gone. If this drought ever ends I will replant something. I couldn't get a Monterrey oak to grow but would like a good shade tree.

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bren
Member

Posts: 56
From: wimberley, tx
Registered: Feb 2009

posted September 08, 2009 09:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bren     Edit/Delete Message
We've lost some spanish oak & live oak out here. A neighbor had an arborist & a guy from the state come out (took them 2 months because they're so busy checking trees) They both said it was definitely drought. We were afraid of oak wilt. We're extremely rocky which creates open spaces & air around roots. Under normal conditions this is ok, but during extreme conditions with no "insulation" around the roots, the trees have no protection. We also have some cedar that parts of have turned totally brown & crispy.

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Reddog
Member

Posts: 396
From: dripping springs, tx, usa
Registered: Apr 2008

posted September 30, 2009 12:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Reddog     Edit/Delete Message
I've heard some nursery folks speculate that the dought has caused drying of the soil much deeper than usual and that the root hairs on trees are being damaged. I've noticed a lot of browned out tips on trees, the newest growth. I would think that with the recent rains they should recover.

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